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Frequently Asked Questions

Q:

What are ultralights?

A:

There are many classifications of ``ultralights`` or ``microlights.`` The term, as it is used in the Federal Aviation Regulations, applies to any vehicle, powered or unpowered, which meets the definitions of FAR Part 103 (Ultralight Vehicles). The terms include powered ultralights (fixed wing, rotorcraft, powered parachutes, etc.) and unpowered ultralights (hang gliders, paragliders, sailplanes, balloons, etc.).

FAR Part 103 definitions restrict weight, speed, and fuel. The definitions currently apply only to single-seat craft. Two-seat craft are permitted for instructional purposes only. Speed is limited to 63 MPH and 5 gallons of fuel can be carried. (reference: http://www.usua.org/faq.htm)

Q:

Do I need a pilot's license?

A:

No, you do not need a pilot's license to fly an ultralight under FAR 103, but it you should be trained as this is real flying in a real airplane.

Q:

What is the weight limit for pilots?

A:

Depending on your plane type and configuration, that weight limit ranges from 170 to 250 lbs.

Q:

What are the flying restrictions?

A:

The FAR Part 103 requires that ultralights: 1) be flown in daylight hours and avoid flying over crowds; 2) not be flown over populated areas or in restricted air space around airports; 3) empty weight must be 254 lbs or less, unless a parachute is added; then the empty weight may be as high as 278lbs. 4) have only 5 gallons of fuel at a time; 5) not exceed 63 mph in level cruise. 6) Be capable of stalling at 28mph or less; 7) Ultralights must yield right-of-way to all other aircraft.